Some Mormons Search the Web and Choose Faith

A lot has been written and discussed the last few months about Mormons who, upon finding unfavorable content on the internet, question their faith and leave the Church.

Likewise, writers and the individuals who comment at the New York Times seem to convey that those who express doubt or disaffect from the church should be celebrated, while those who express faith only do so because they live happily inside a bubble that resides somewhere between blind acceptance and sheltered naiveté.

I don’t mean to suggest that the crisis of faith experienced by members is not a serious matter. Having experienced a mild crisis of faith myself several years ago, I have sympathy for those who feel that they cannot find the answers they seek – either from others or from heaven itself. So without question, there are people who leave the Church. But a lot stay and stay informed. And a lot join too, having done a full load of honest investigating.

I recently read two sincere and candid conversion stories of two young adults who tell of their honest investigating and ultimate decision to join The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

Why I Became a Mormon was posted a couple of weeks ago by Brittany, a good friend of mine, who spoke of her journey in becoming a Latter-day Saint. And the other came from a guy named Daniel, who went from being Jewish to being an atheist, and is now a full-fledged Latter-day Saint who served as a missionary in Russia and currently attends law school at BYU. Daniel maintains his own blog, symphonyofdissent, which contains thoughtful posts written before and after he was baptized.

Both Brittany and Daniel write how they read everything they could find about the church – both good and bad – and still felt confident in their decision to join the church. To me, their honest declarations of faith and testimony are more powerful, more convincing, and more encouraging than the expressions of skepticism by those who publicize their private doubts.

We will always have questions. And perhaps we will occasionally struggle with doubts. But Christ never seemed to place too much of a premium on the doubt or disbelief of skeptics. As I noted last week in my Throwback Thursday post on Elder Holland’s repeated message, in the eyes of God, Thomas’ publicized doubts were not deemed superior to the quiet faith of those who believe. Remember too, that Jesus promises to manifest himself by the power of the Holy Ghost to all those who believe in him (2 Nephi 26:13). Brittany’s and Daniel’s experiences underscore this point extremely well.

This entry was posted in How can I know?, Question & Answer and tagged , , , , by Anthony in Minneapolis. Bookmark the permalink.

About Anthony in Minneapolis

I'm a Mormon who lives in Minneapolis. I'm a father of two little kids, a graduate student at the University of Minnesota, and someone who enjoys reading, running, and exploring ways to stay warm in Midwest winters! There are lots of things I love about being a Latter-day Saint, but I also enjoy learning from others how their faith informs and influences their lives. Whether you're a Catholic in California or a Baptist in Baltimore or nothing in particular, I hope we can get to know each other and share our beliefs and experiences to promote understanding and friendship. I also hope that the posts on Mormon in Minnesota will convey some insight into what it's like being a Latter-day Saint generally, and what it's like in Minnesota specifically.

4 thoughts on “Some Mormons Search the Web and Choose Faith

  1. This is a big reason I started blogging and want to continue blogging more actively. I’ve been hit with every anti imaginable and am familiar with pretty much all the quips of the naysayers. They are all extremely vocal in their negative views/slanders and half truths, and I want to be vocal in my declarations of faith. I know it’s true, and those who truly seek will know it is too. Good post.

  2. This is a great post. I’ve spent the last few years working with people who find themselves in a faith-crisis and have tried to help them work through questions, doubts, etc. One of the great articles I’ve read is, “I Don’t Have a Testimony of Church History” by Davis Bitton. You may be familiar with it. I do believe that informed, faithful members of the Church can have questions and at the same time have strong, growing testimonies, fueled by the witness of the Spirit. I really enjoyed your post today! Thanks!

    • Thanks BJM. It’s been awhile since I’ve read that Bitton piece. I’ll revisit it! Thanks for the recommendation.

      I agree with you, in fact I think strong growing testimonies often come from asking questions. After all, the restoration started with a simple yet honest question in a boy who really just wanted to receive an answer.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s