The Burden of Belief and Pursing Truth: Part 1

I was born into a strong Mormon family. Every Sunday I put on my tie, or in earlier years cinched up my bolo tie (hey don’t judge, I grew up in New Mexico… on second thought maybe you should judge), climbed into the “middle seat with the feet on the hump” in our 1976 Chevy Beauville Van, and went to church with my five older siblings and parents.

I learned about God, about revelation, about scripture and prayer, about Jesus, about being kind and responsible. Some Sundays I was bored, some Sundays I was engaged, and some Sundays I was excited to see if I could sit next to the new girl. During the week my parents made sure to pray and study with us regularly and hold weekly family nights complete with spiritual lessons, songs, treats, and family arguments (teenagers are just the worst).

I even practiced some of what I was taught. I prayed regularly, read scripture, attended church classes, and avoided most of the things I was taught to avoid (dating young, addictive substances, etc.).

At age 20, though, I encountered serious doubt. While serving as a full time volunteer for my church I learned that my oldest brother, a hero of mine, no longer believed in God. Frankly, I hadn’t considered that possibility, and now I was forced to. The implications of it all came crashing down. Had I been inadvertently brain washed by my own family and religion? Did I invent spiritual experiences and selectively remember convenient coincidence to match my conditioning? Was it all born of some human need to feel important and avoid the reality that we die and cease to exist?

For days I agonized over these questions. I prayed regularly asking God (if he was there) to make himself known to me, to remove my doubt, to solidify my foundation of faith so it could not be broken. I saw no angel, I heard no voice, and I did not climb a mountain to talk to a burning bush. No, I more or less felt nothing… nothing more than I had always felt – a calm, quiet peace that perhaps I had invented.

So for a few days I allowed myself to not believe and freed my mind to pursue existence without God. At first I felt fear – fear of being finite and unimportant, a temporary fixture on this accidental life-sustaining planet. Some believe that fear is the only reason religion exists, to give us weak humans a crutch to lean on. However, I found something even more shocking. Even without God I was confronted again with a need for belief.

The scientific method has done much to uncover truth, but it cannot answer many questions: Where did the energy to create the big bang come from? And what forces govern sub-atomic particles? And what is space? Does it have an end? What will all the space and planets look like in 100 billion years? And beyond that infinitely? And what set of instructions dictated leaps in evolution from single-celled organism to fish to mammal to human? What makes humans different than other life? Why are we so fallible? What is morality and conscience? With or without God, there is an inability to comprehend the undeniable eternity and complexity that surrounds us, and therefore there is a need for belief, for faith in something that is not seen but is believed to be true. Rejecting God does not relieve that burden of belief.

I determined that the only way to justify my own belief, whether in a God or in the absence of God, was to examine as much evidence as I could. Ironically what was at first a crisis of faith became a firm foundation of enduring faith and confidence. I’ll tell you about it in the 2nd part of this two-part post…

7 thoughts on “The Burden of Belief and Pursing Truth: Part 1

  1. You just wrote what I’ve been trying to explain to my athiest friends forever! “Ironically what was at first a crisis of faith became a firm foundation of enduring faith and confidence.” I had my questions and doubts in college. I studied psychology and minored in philosophy…so short of majoring in theology I don’t think I could have gotten any closer to the questions of our time, past, present and future! And what it all led back to was exactly where you are going. I came to my own conclusions, because the lack of a higher power just didn’t LOGICALLY make sense! Take “religion” out of it, and deal with just science and philosophy and it just doesn’t make sense. The arguments for the lack of existence aren’t sound, to me. And so many arguments seem to be based on anger against a God that doesn’t exist…etc etc.

    Wonderfully written.

    • Thanks, Hacken! It has definitely been an empowering realization. I have watched as intellectuals belittle people of faith and look down their noses at their “weakness”, that is their faith. And yet the reality is that each of us have to make sense of the world around us, but there isn’t an obvious right answer and anyone who pretends their is is likely wrapped up in some serious self-doubt and insecurity.

      I really appreciate your comment – thank you for reading!

  2. Pingback: The Burden of Belief and Pursuing Truth: Part 2 | Mormon In Minnesota

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